My Favorite Vehicles From The 1990s

It began in Marin County, California and ended in Northern Virginia. In-between was a series of discoveries with the automobile as a key factor along the way.

My Favorite Cars From The 1950s

The 1950s provided a glimpse into the future. The Soviets blasted off into space, which was inconceivable at the time. We were flying in faster jet-powered airliners, plugging in guitars, basses and everything else in our music. We even saw a nation that could possibly be integrated and united.

My Favorite All-American Machines

The rules are strict here – their final assembly must be solely done right here. That eliminates a lot of favorite cars, I am afraid. It also eliminates some of the best cars ever built because they were built elsewhere included in the USA.

Commentary: Unpacking Stellantis's EV Day

There is a lot to unpack here. However, Stellantis made this a bit easier for me to navigate their strategy through the slogans that goes with each brand. The slogan is the messenger for what exactly they plan for each brand. Some of them are too tasty to read. Others fit what they are doing already or plan to do in the future.

Historiography: The Rise of the Mini-Truck

What we saw were the results of these measures that shaped the automotive industry in North America in 1982. It wasn’t enough to build smaller passenger cars. There was something else that took place that also changed the way we looked at transportation – for both work and play.

The Pinnacle of The Minivan

Luxury is what the Chrysler brand has always been known for. Go back in history when the vision of Chrysler was attainable luxury and prestige. For example, the Imperial was badged as a Chrysler until 1955. That car was understated in the way it presents itself to wealthy clientele. It also instilled a sense of luxury that guides the Chrysler brand today.

Historiography: The Original Franco-American Affair

If divine foreign intervention did not come in time for an American automaker, the company in question would have probably ceased to exist by 1982.

It is an audacious statement to make where history was thwarted to save a company from extinction. We’ve seen this many times over the past 30 years where Detroit-based automakers sought alliances and acquisitions with other automakers around the globe. To recall each one would be a massive effort to digest and analyze. Yet, most of the readers of this site have probably forgotten the scenario that put American Motors on the brink before Renault came in to assist them through most of the 1980s.

Historiography: Chrysler, Iacocca and the K-Car

However, one particular story captured the most headlines in the automotive world during the course of 1981-82 school year. When people talked about automobiles, many conversations came up – either positive or dismissive. Yet, you could not ignore it – the commercials were all over and the vehicles were selling. He appeared in a good chunk of his company's spots – with a manifesto on his lips: "If you could find a better car, buy it!"